Why is My Dog Calm With Me But Not My Husband?

Why is My Dog Calm With Me But Not My Husband?

Why is my dog calm with me but not my husband
Why is My Dog Calm With Me But Not My Husband?
Taking care of your dog means you have to feed it, walk it, groom it, and train it.
Your husband may be a fun person to have around, especially if he’s good at training and rewards your dog for her success.
Your husband could also be a good leader for your dog, which might make her feel safer around him. Regardless, you can reduce this behavior with some training.
Aggression
There are many reasons why your dog may be more calm with you than with your husband. She may have developed fears about him as a puppy that have remained unresolved.
Your dog might be anxious about him because she didn't see enough men during her puppyhood. She might also be afraid of him because of the way he looks or his voice.
If your dog is constantly trying to lick him and tries to grab his legs, this could be a sign of fear or anxiety.
The etiology of aggression is multifaceted, and must be examined in relation to biological, psychological, and socioeconomic factors. It involves genetics, brain structures, medical diseases, neurotransmitters, hormones, abused substances, and medications.
The main type of aggression is affective, or anger-based, which is sometimes called hostile, impulsive or reactive aggression. This type of aggression is usually aimed at harming the target and often comes with the intent to hurt.
Jealousy
Jealousy is a common feeling, but it can become unhealthy and negatively impact your mental health. Unaddressed jealousy can lead to a variety of behaviors, including distrust, paranoia, abuse, and even physical violence.
There are many types of jealousy, such as romantic jealousy and suspicious jealousy. Both types of jealousy can build up over time, and can be a source of tension in your relationship.
Often times, you can tell if you are feeling jealous by examining your behavior. For example, if you’re irritated when your partner spends more time with their friends than you do, this could be indicative of jealousy.
Another way to recognize if you’re jealous is to check your self-talk. For instance, if you’re thinking that your partner was invited to the movies with someone else, this could be an indication of jealousy.
Fear
Fear is a biological response to a perceived threat. It's an essential survival mechanism for our ancestors and may still be helpful today, especially when we are in situations that could be life-or-death.
The brain sends signals to the nervous system to activate the 'fight or flight' response, which causes physical responses such as an increased heart rate, blood pressure and breathing. The body is also stimulated to sweat and increase in muscle tension, which can lead to goosebumps.
However, this response can be unhealthy and even dangerous for our health. It can weaken our immune system and cause heart disease, gastrointestinal problems and even premature death.
Anxiety
It’s possible your dog is a little anxious around men. He may have a fear of them because of their appearance: They are bigger and taller, have deeper voices, and usually wear glasses.
It also might be because she wasn’t exposed to many men as a puppy. The way she was raised and her social skills have a lot to do with how she reacts to them now.
Risk factors for anxiety disorders include genetics, stress and a history of mental health problems. Childhood sexual abuse, for example, is linked to anxiety later in life.
Treatment for anxiety includes psychotherapy (talk therapy), medication, and other approaches. Getting help early is best.
The most effective treatment is cognitive behavioral therapy, or CBT. This therapy teaches patients to change negative thoughts that trigger panic attacks. It may involve medication, such as antidepressants, which work well for anxiety.